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Posts Tagged ‘POLITICS’

THE  PEOPLES YOUNiVERSITY: BROUGHT TO YOU BY OCCUPY PORTSMOUTH : 4TH -5TH FEBRUARY 2012.

TWO DAYS OF LECTURES ARE TAKING PLACE  OUTSIDE THE ANGLICAN CATHEDRAL IN THE HIGH STREET OF OLD PORTSMOUTH, ON THE GREEN.  AMONGST  THE LECTURERS SO FOR HAVE BEEN , KEITH TAYLOR THE GREEN MEMBER OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIMENT FOR SOUTH EAST ENGLAND DISCUSSING CHRONIC AIR POLLUTION .HE ALSO TOOK QUESTIONS ON THE EUROPEAN PARLIMENT. 

BEA CAMPBELL THE AWARD WINNING JOURNALIST AND LEADING FEMINIST THINKER  WAS LOOKING AT WHAT HAS GONE WRONG WITH OUR WORLD.

TODAYS SPEAKERS INCLUDE : JENNY FLINTOFT AND ZUBER HATIA  TALKING ABOUT  JUSTICE FOR PALESTINE .SMASH EDO  WILL BE DISCUSSING , NO TO THE ARMS TRADE .

THE EVENT IS ON FROM 12PM TO 4-20PM.

YOU CAN CONTACT  OCCUPY PORTSMOUTH ON :    wearethe99percent@hotmail.com

 

 

 

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A  REPORT FROM THE NEWSPAPER  MATURE  TIMES   The voice of our generation . 2011 – 2012.

Sports archivists have uncovered never before – seen pictures of Britains first ever female football team – set up by Suffragette for the Rights of Women movement in 1881. The astonishing black and white photographs show the moment pioneering campaigners swapped their corsets for football shirts and formed ‘Mrs Grahams XI’.  Historians believe that the side helped women win the local Government vote and even sparked riots, after stepping onto the football pitch in revealing bloomers and blouses. Images of the team,  from Stirling, Scotland, were uncovered by artist Stuart Gibbs, 47 while compiling an exhibition about the history of the women’s game.

He said “They were on the cutting edge. The day after a controversial match in Glasgow the right for women to vote got the royal assent” .”The players were all part of the rights for women and the ‘rational dress movement’, so maybe the game was seen as a sign of the times and had some influence. ”

The stunning shots were uncovered by artist Mr Gibbs while researching `Moving  the Goalposts : A History of Womens Football in Britain’ currently touring the UK.  He compiled an album of pictures after scouring local libaries in Stirling. Mr Gibbs found suffragette Scot Helen Matthews, who played under the name Mrs Graham, had set up the first official womens club in the city.

The team known as Mrs Grahams XI – also the first national side-played their first official match at Easter Road ,on May 7, 1881. From that point on the team were never far away from controversy. The second game, against England at Shawfield Athletic Ground in Glasgow, on May 16 1881 sparked riots when they beat the visiting team 3-0.

Following the riots, the Womens Franchise (Scotland) Bill was given the royal assent, allowing women to vote in local government elections. This was a right women in England had enjoyed for two decades.  But the events of that day caused such a stir that a Government ban was imposed on women playing football in Scotland.

The team – which even included the world’s first black female footballer, Carrie Boustead – were considered “improper” by their male counterparts. But they battled on to eventually obtain recognition. Mr Gibbs said, “There were critics right from day one. Even women’s magazines were against it, even though you wouldn’ t think they would be. It just wasn’t acceptable for women to dress in trousers and football was considered a man’s game.

“The women had lots of fans, but they also had lots of objectors and there were a few problems caused by hooligans who tried to disrupt the game. Female teams played right through the First World War – but on December 5, 1921 the English Football Association voted to ban womens football from grounds used by its member clubs. The ban was not lifted until July 1971.

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JESSICA  SHEPERD : EDUCATION CORRESPONDENT OF THE GUARDIAN REPORTED ON THE 27TH DECEMBER 2011.

The Guardian spoke to scores of associations  representing educational workers and requested figures from councils through the Freedom of Information Act. The information shows that schools are ending or cutting funds for an initiative lauded by reseachers that offered one to one tuition for pupils falling behind in reading , writing, and maths .”

“Researchers proved that the initiative accelerates pupils progress and gives them confidence. Hertfordshire county council said fewer schools in its area were now giving one to one tuition. They were concentrating on smaller group work instead.”

“The Department of Education says schools still recieve their grant for one to one tuition , but it is no longer ringfenced and can be spent on other areas. “

Mary Bousted, general secretary of the Association of Teachers and Lecturers , warned that the cuts  uncovered by The  Guardian would lead to “Englands long tail of under- achievement getting longer” She feared the most vunerable would suffer the most and fall further behind .Gove had been disingenuous in assuming the front line would be protected, she said” “Meanwhile essential help for children falling behind in maths and English is being scaled back.”

“One to One Tuition in maths and English is being dramatically reduced. In April funds for such tuition stopped being ringfenced and many schools have diverted funds elsewhere .”Many local authorities have a service that co-ordinates one to one tuition in schools . But, in such areas as Hertfordshire the services have had to be cut. the local council says it has noticed that fewer schools are giving such tuition and has reduced its team from six to two.”

**DISCUSS*******COMMENT******DISCUSS*******COMMENT******DISCUSS*******COMMENT*********DISCUSS**

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In a recent SENCO Update Sally Copley, the head of Save the Children, has argued that the pupil premium could be the key to breaking the attainment gap but added, “we believe the government should set this at an extra £3,000 for every disadvantaged child. That would double the weighting such children currently receive and give them a much better chance of fulfilling their academic potential.”

The premium will in fact amount to £430 per pupil based on a child eligible for various types of benefit or/and earnings of the parents of less than £16,000 per year. It will cover some 15% of all pupils in maintained schools. The cost of this will be £625 million this year but in the future eligibility will widen and spending will rise to £2.5 billion by 2014/15.

The thinking behind this is that the entitlement to free school meals is a proxy one for households with low incomes. The pupils from these households achieve educational outcomes that are poor. Seventy Five percent of poor children achieve the expected level when leaving primary school, compared to 95% of children of the richest households. Corresponding figures on the achievement of 5 good GCSEs that include English and Maths are those of 20% and 75%.

Therefore, the pupil premium is being put in place due to the lack of a  robust relationship between school resources and the performance of the pupil. In the funding of the pupil there are huge differences. The Schools White Paper focused on 72 secondary schools outside London where funding that was based on  access to central grants, historical models, and local authority policies varied between just below £4k to well over £5.5k.  Such variations do not appear to be reflected in performance. Pupil premium therefore is seen as targeting the funding more closely to the apparent need.

A  Warning By Professionals.

Laren Higgs comments on the pupil premium in  Chidren & Young People  Now when she says that Education professionals are warning that disadvantaged children could be left without vital support in certain parts of the country, as the Department for Education (DfE) have revealed how the pupil premium is set to be distributed across England. The pupil premium will only cover cuts elsewhere in budgets and some disadvantaged students may even be worse off.

Michael Trobe, policy director at the Association  of School and College Leaders, said schools will need “critical mass” of pupil premium children if the cash is to make a difference to the attainment of the most disadvantaged. “A great deal will depend on how many pupil premiums each school gets ,” he explained. “If you’re working on an individual student basis then the money won’t  go very far. On average it would take five to six pupil premiums just to put on an extra one-hour group, once a week. You’d need 30 pupil premiums just to put on one extra hour per week for each of your five year groups. It’s a drop in the ocean in that respect.”

The deputy general secretary of the Association of Teachers and Lecturers, Martin Freedman also argued that most schools will simply “put the pupil premium in the overall pot and use it to offset the cuts they’ve received elsewhere. Unless you’re a school that has turned into an academy recently, your budget has had a real-terms cut this year,” he said. “The government claims this is additional money, but they are being a bit disingenuous. We trust their decisions, however, it is important that there is transparency about how the money is spent. Therefore, we ask schools to report to parents annually about how they have used the pupil premium. The extent to which schools improve the attainment of disadvantaged pupils will be covered by the wider accountability system that we are developing.”

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Four Dyslexia Centres on the Isle of Wight are to be closed by the IW County Council. The direct teaching service currently being delivered at these centres will discontinue. Responsibility for pupils with specific learning difficulties (SpLD) will move into Island classrooms. Schools will be given the funding to train classroom teachers to support dyslexic children within mainstream eductation. One part-time Dyslexia Centre teacher who will be made redundant has decided to work directly with schools and parents. Sarah Luke believes one-to-one direct teaching is more beneficial as it is her area of expertise. However, she does not explain how this will be achieved. Will funding be available for her to be employed by the schools? If not then parents only remaining option is to hire her to work with their child.

Pat Carter already works privately on a one-to-one basis with students who  have  dyslexia . She  empowers them to construct  their  essays by using a unique blend of methods and skills. See the Testimonials below and on the Testimonials page.

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PORTSMOUTH ,  May  2011  :

In  Portsmouth,  schools  should  have  the  capacity  to  support  One  To  One  Tuition  through  the  Pupil  Premium.  Especially  those  who  are   Looked  After  Children, and  children  who  are  at  risk  of  not  making  progress.

CONSIDER  THIS……. FROM THE BBC  WEBSITE  :

On  the BBC  News  Education  and  Family  website  Mike  Baker  a  freelance  education  journalist  and   broadcaster  said:  “Nor  is  it  that,  as  the  government  confirmed  in  it’s  spending  allocations  statement,  some   individual  schools  will  not  only  fail  to  get  a  real  terms  spending  increase,  but  may  get  an  absolute  cash  terms  cut.”

A   tutor  spoke  to  the  BBC  and  said : “I  have worked  as  a  One  To One  Tutor  for  the  last  two  years  and  have  seen  first  hand  the  benefits  of  this  provision.  Pupils  have  shown  a  huge  increase  in  confidence. Not  only  with  working  with  me  individually,  but  also  when  they  are  back  in  the  classroom.

Their academic  improvement  has  been  amazing, far  beyond  what  was  expected.  For  some  children  just  having  someone  to  reassure  them  at  every  step  makes  the  difference.  Take  this  provision  away  and  I  dread  to  think  what  will  happen  to  British  education.”  R. UK.

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